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You Are Here Growers > Insects > Headclipper Weevil




Headclipper Weevil

Headclipper weevil
Headclipper weevil
The adult sunflower Headclipping weevil (Haplorhynchites aeneus Boheman) is shiny black and about 5/16 inch long. Larvae are cream colored and C-shaped and grub-like in appearance.

Headclipper weevil on stalk
Headclipper weevil on stalk
Life Cycle: Adults emerge in mid-July and may be found on plants for 2 to 3 weeks. Females feed on pollen and nectar of flowering heads. Eggs are laid in the head. The female feeds around the neck of the stalk causing the head to break off. The larvae develop and overwinter in the fallen head.

Headclipper damage to stalk
Headclipper damage
to stalk
Damage: Damage is usually sporadic and localized on field margins and the insect is most often found in the High Plains. There have been reports of 20% clipped heads in some fields.

Economic Thresholds: This is not well defined. Insecticide application may be advisable if one out of every two plants has an adult present and if head clipping exceeds 5% on average across the field.

Scouting Method: The familiar X pattern is recommended for counting adults.

Management: Insecticide application may be advisable if one out of every two plants has an adult present and if head clipping exceeds 5% on average across the field.

Research: Work on this insect has been very limited due to its lack of economic injury.

Photos: Visit the Photo Gallery.

Source: High Plains Sunflower Production Handbook, June 2005

For further information, click on the link below.



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